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Wasen in Springtime

Dinkelacker Beer Tent

Dinkelacker Beer Tent, last year

Internationally, we all know about Oktoberfest, especially because it’s now celebrated in countries all over the world.

In Stuttgart at least, we have it two times a year except that in spring it’s called Spring Fest and the one in September/October is the main event that everyone comes to Germany for. The place that it’s held here is called the Wasen, which is why many refer to it as such.

The Höllenblitz ride

The Höllenblitz ride

There are rides, games, food stalls with all of the classics (Currywurst, Bratwurst, sweets, Lebkuchenherzen – Gingerbread hearts with cutsie sayings) and of course, the beer tents.

This time around we went for a quick stroll over the entire grounds, having snacks and something to drink. The weather was not great, which was actually a blessing in disguise because it meant that it wasn’t overly full. I’ve experienced times where it was hard to walk or breathe because of the amount of people standing around.

That fest-feeling is not yet here because the weather has been so topsy-turvy in Germany lately, so I’m looking forward to September when the bigger Oktoberfest is on!

Come on, summer!

Gallery

Oktoberfest

Yes, it was that time of the year again in Germany, from the end of September to mid October people from all over the world travel to Germany, particularly Munich and dress up in Dirndls and Lederhosen so that they can get pissed and look funny while doing it. Not only do tourists love this, but even Germans from other cities who don’t otherwise get a chance to dress up in this way.

In actuality, only a small group of people who live in Bavaria wear those clothes and they’re usually very expensive and high quality. However, this time of the year calls for everyone to suddenly adopt this appearance. Braids, Bavarian hats and a tonne of ‘bier’.

Dinkelacker Beer Tent

Dinkelacker Beer Tent

This year I headed into the Dinkelacker tent where some friends had reserved a table. I was pleasantly surprised to see that our table was upstairs and not in the main area with the rest of the drunken revellers. There was still a great atmosphere upstairs and enough drunken, happy people not causing problems to make it lots of fun.

But Oktoberfest is not only for adults over the legal drinking age of 18. Families with children love it because of the rides, candy and games.

A maß (litre) of beer

A maß (litre) of beer

I managed to drink one Maß (one litre) and pump up my arm muscles in the process. Those glasses alone are heavy, let alone with a litre of beer in them! I wouldn’t want to get into a fight with one of those barmaids…

Pork knuckle (Schweinshaxe)

Pork knuckle (Schweinshaxe)

Traditionally, you would go into a beer tent and drink many litres of beer and eat half a chicken. This time, with my one litre, I also had most of a pork knuckle (Schweinshaxe). Those things are amazing when made properly. This one was delicious with a crispy crust and plenty of meat.

Oktoberfest is first and foremost a Bavarian thing and the biggest one in Germany takes place in Munich, with the second-largest being in Stuttgart. The fireworks yesterday evening marked the end of Oktoberfest here in Stuttgart, but it happens twice a year (in Spring it’s called the Spring Fest) so it’ll come around again soon enough!

Gallery

Tripsdrill

Birthday booklet

Best part about my birthday present: choosing what to do for the day

My birthday was last Friday and as a special surprise from my husband, I received some gifts as well as a self-made booklet. As he is a graphic designer, it also looked awesome. This little booklet contained 9 options of things that I could do on my birthday, as well as the weather forecast for the day and a sentence saying that he had taken the day off work to spend the day with me. Best first birthday as a married couple ever!

There were a ton of cool things to do, including going to the zoo in Karlsruhe, shopping and a sushi lunch, checking out the castle and gardens in Ludwigsburg, spending time at the Spring Oktoberfest (Frühlingsfest) in Stuttgart, going swimming at the mineral baths, going to the Wilhelma and spending the day at Tripsdrill.

Having never been to Tripsdrill and loving rollercoasters and rides, the choice was easy. I’ve been to Europapark which is a massive theme park. We were there 2 years ago and wanting to do everything, we arrived at 9am. We left at about 5pm and still did not try every single ride. Tripsdrill on the other hand is a much smaller amusement park and from what I had heard it was aimed at a younger demographic, so naturally, I was not expecting too much but nevertheless I was excited.

We arrived at the park at about 9.30am because the forecast said that it would start to rain just after midday. Not all of the rides were open yet and at the carpark there were about 10-15 cars there. Keep in mind, it was a Friday and not school holidays. A dream, if you’ve read our post about Universal Studios Singapore!

As it was my birthday I had free admission and received a Tripsdrill badge with my name on it, and was greeted and wished a happy birthday by the staff. We went in and rode some of the smaller rides, and I have to say that I was pleasantly surprised. Although some rides are skewed to younger thrillseekers, they were not too shabby for us either. As a huge plus, we were mostly on rides all by ourselves and never had to line up or wait to get onto a ride.

Tripsdrill is about an hour and a half drive from Stuttgart (of course, depending on the traffic) and because it’s in Schwabenland (this area of Southern Germany) the staff were amazingly friendly and the theme of the park is very traditional. Food is well-priced and generous and the entire place is neat and tidy.

Flume Ride

Badewannen-Fahrt: The flume ride at Tripsdrill

The weather was perfectly sunny and even hot at times during our visit. We left at about 1pm and had conquered every ride. I enjoyed all of them, but of course as a bit of an adrenaline junkie I enjoyed the bigger rides the most. There is a great flume ride where you sit in a bath tub and a big wooden rollercoaster called ‘Mammut’ (Mammoth). Sometimes I feel like rides are way too short, but at Tripsdrill they seem to have mastered each ride and made them great experiences for the park guests. There was only one ride where I felt like ‘oh, was that it?’ but then we were sent around again automatically. On a few of the rides they also make souvenir photos or videos, which is always cool to see.

The ticket price also includes entry into the adjoining Wild Paradise (Wildparadies) where you can see a number of different wild animals, however we were worn out from all the rides.

All in all I think that they have a great variety of rides and animatronics around the park to make it interesting and exciting for young and old. I know that I can’t wait to go back some day and take more people with us once they’ve finished building their latest rollercoaster.